<p>On Jul 28, 2012 12:32 PM, "Karl Fogel" <<a href="mailto:kfogel@red-bean.com">kfogel@red-bean.com</a>> wrote:<br>
> Are you sure that's true?  We're very experienced with a particular kind<br>
> of UI.  There is a class of UI designers who concentrate on a different<br>
> style of UI (newbie-oriented UIs) who sometimes mistakenly think that<br>
> "newbie-friendly" and "good" are synonyms.  Those people are usually<br>
> horrified when they see how Emacs works.  Since people who use Emacs as<br>
> it needs to be used -- treating it as an "investment user interface" --<br>
> have a pretty good experience with it, I'm skeptical of any UI designer<br>
> who doesn't understand the tradeoffs behind that fact.  Which is a lot<br>
> of UI designers, in my experience.</p>
<p>You're not straw-manning here? Fine, so imagine we're talking to a great UI designer, who gets Emacs.</p>
<p>We have experience *using* interfaces, but much less experience *designing* them. Users always feel boxed in where good designers see options.</p>
<p>Why the emphasis on discoverability? I wanted your smart-transpose feature in my own Emacs, built-in, but I know Emacs has so much wonderful stuff already that I don't know about that I knew that if your stuff had gone in upstream, I still wouldn't have known about it.</p>